Seeing Butterflies

£9.99£14.99

Originally published in collaboration with the Royal Entomological Society, a limited number of copies of Philip Howse’s Seeing Butterflies, New Perspectives on Colour, Patterns and Mimicry, described in the foreword by Jeremy Thomas OBE as “a great natural history book that will be read with fascination and delight by amateur entomologists, keen schoolchildren and serious entomologists alike”, are being offered at a discounted price.

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About This Book

Originally published in collaboration with the Royal Entomological Society, a limited number of copies of Philip Howse’s Seeing Butterflies, New Perspectives on Colour, Patterns and Mimicry, described in the foreword by Jeremy Thomas OBE as “a great natural history book that will be read with fascination and delight by amateur entomologists, keen schoolchildren and serious entomologists alike”, are being offered at a discounted price. Howse argues that insect predators such as birds see a greater range of colours than we do and focus on details rather than whole objects. Engraved on the wings of many butterflies and moths, among the rainbow colours and the opalescence, are images that closely resemble millipedes, salamanders, frogs, snakes, falcons, spiders, hornets, bats, large canine teeth, claws, caterpillars, wolves, and owls. He explains how these colours and designs have evolved and how the insects are protected by such camouflage, mimicry and deception. Separate chapters are devoted to commonly seen groups of butterflies, such as whites, admirals, emperors, monarchs, swallowtails, blues and morphos, peacocks and passion vine butterflies as well as hawkmoths and giant silkmoths.